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HPV Resources for Health Care Workers

HPV care for your patients.

Ways to Improve Your Practice

These 10 tips from the CDC will help you attain and maintain high HPV vaccinations rates in your practice.
  1. Appreciate the significance of achieving high HPV vaccination rates
  2. Acknowledge the importance your recommendation has when it comes to parents choosing to get their children vaccinated
  3. Use an effective approach by bundling your vaccine recommendation
  4. Motivate your team and encourage their immunization conversations with parents
  5. Implement systems to ensure you never miss an opportunity to vaccinate
Click here to view all 10 HPV vaccination success tips.

Resources for School Nurses

School nurses play an important role in protecting the next generation from cancers caused by HPV. School nurses can encourage parents to talk to their child's healthcare provider to make sure their children are up-to-date with all their vaccinations. In addition to providing a strong recommendation, school nurses can provide reminders to students and families about when to begin the vaccination series. School nurses can also access state immunization information systems to identify students who need to be vaccinated. Educating parents about the importance of the HPV vaccination can save children's lives. Take action by:
  • Make recommendations, send out this school nurse letter to parents
  • Hang a poster in your school office about the HPV vaccination
  • Educate yourself about the types of questions parents often have about the HPV vaccination and how to address their concerns

Resources for Dentists

There are 100 types of human papillomavirus (HPV) and some can infect the mouth and throat. Though most cases of HPV clear up, for some people illness persists and can turn into cancer. Cancers of the mouth and throat are called cancers of the oropharynx, which includes the back of the throat, the base of the tongue, and the tonsils. Research suggests that vaccination against HPV may sharply reduce oral HPV infections. Signs and symptoms include:
  • A sore, or soreness or irritation that doesn't go away
  • Red or white patches, or pain, tenderness, or numbness in mouth or lips
  • Lumps, thickening tissues, rough spots, crusty or eroded areas
Visit the American Dental Association website for more HPV symptoms.

The HPV Epidemic

The Missouri Cancer Consortium, in partnership with the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Immunization Program, is sponsoring a limited number of free online viewings of Someone You Love - The HPV Epidemic for Missouri health providers and Missouri residents. Click here to watch the trailer.